How did Isaiah know about cosmic inflation (Big Bang) so long before Guth, Starobinsky, and Linde?

Dr. Michelle Thaller, Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA on bigthink.com, Big Bang wasn’t an explosion: Thaller suggests we – Visualize it like this: “The Big Bang wasn’t an explosion of matter; it was an expansion of space itself.” She then reminds us we should not get confused when we think of it like blowing up a balloon. “Pretend that there’s no such thing as inside or outside of the balloon, just the two-dimensional surface of rubber. As you blow into it, that expands [stretches] in every direction.”

To order the fascinating book, Marty’s Dark Matter, click on M. Kasey, author at top of this website.

Cosmic Inflation was coined the Big Bang by Fred Hoyle in 1949 which unintentionally suggested the original energy of the universe was like an explosion.

Cosmologist refer to it as cosmic inflation and liken it to blowing up a balloon, the surface stretching outward from every point.

Physicist Alan Guth, the father of cosmic inflation theory and professor of physics at MIT, describes emerging ideas about where our universe comes from in an article produced for Kavli Prize by Scientific American Custom Media. The big question to Guth was, “What was it that banged?’ The answer lies in his theory of cosmic inflation. “According to the theory, for less than a millionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second after the universe’s birth, an exotic form of matter exerted a counterintuitive force. “It only has to be a speck,” Guth says. “But when that speck starts to inflate, the expansion is exponential.”

So what are some of the exciting new things Guth with Sean Carroll (physicist at Caltech) suggest was there before the speck or inflation in this very interesting scientificamerican.com article?

1. The universe is actually eternal — no beginning to explain

2. Inflation creation would not have worked with just the matter we can see. The assumption is there must be other matter, perhaps dark matter.

3. Primordial black holes could conceivably be dark matter.

4. Once inflation starts, it never completely stops. It ends in places and universes form there and other universes keep forming. “There’s always a volume of exotic repulsive gravity material that can inflate forever, producing an infinite number of these pocket universes in an never-ending procession.”

It is interesting that Isaiah appears to have known about cosmic inflation long before Guth, Starobinsky, and Linde.

Isaiah 40:22, “It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth [presides over?] and stretcheth [cosmic inflation?] out the heavens as a curtain and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in [spiritual (dark matter) and earthly (normal matter) existence?].

Interestingly, ‘stretching’ universe references can also be found in Genesis 1:3, Psalms 104:2 and Pearl of Great Price’s Moses 7:30.

Something to think about, M. Kasey

What if increasing autism rates demonstrate genetic entropy?

The Second Law of Thermodynamics, entropy, is the tendency of all closed systems to drift toward a state of disorder rather than order. Marty, the main character of the novel, Marty’s Dark Matter, struggles with autism as shown in the below excerpt from the book.

To order this gripping novel of psychological drama, deep philosophical musings on life, creation, and the meaning of life, click M. Kasey, author at top of website home page.

If entropy is responsible for mental illness, how can the afflicted person’s final judgement be fair? Probably because, “… for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart.” 1 Samuel 16:7

Click on About in the website heading to find more information about ASD.

M. Kasey